Corporate Project Management Professional (pmp)®
Certification Training

Ready for the next step? Our advanced training courses help you develop professional knowledge, skills and behaviours to deliver project more efficiently and successfully.

advanced workshops

Project Controls In Practice

In this course we explore the vital importance of effective project controls and their role in commercial project success during each phase of the project from bidding to contract close.

Overview

There is increasing evidence that effective project controls are one of the most important conditions for project success. A practical and pragmatic approach to project controls establishes the foundations on which effective governance and high performing project teams can be built. In many ways it’s about doing the basics well including; planning the work, working the plan, understanding the risks, controlling changes, and establishing a clear structure for reporting, governance and information flow. Without a solid foundation, based on the principles of effective planning and control, project teams face an uphill struggle from the outset.

In this course we explore the vital importance of effective project controls and their role in commercial project success during each phase of the project from bidding to contract close. We will then look at how these principles can be applied in a flexible way to match the level of control to the complexity of the project.

This course is not just about processes but also the behaviours and culture needed to deploy an effective project controls framework. For this reason the course is appropriate for the entire project management team including project managers, planners, quantity surveyors, cost estimators, risk analysts and project controls staff.

The course will be highly interactive, drawing on the latest research and using a case study based learning style. During the course you will have an opportunity to prepare a simulated bid for the project control services for HS2.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this course you will be able to:

  1. Explain why project controls is one of the key factors for project success.
  2. Apply a project controls framework to a complex project.
  3. Adapt the level of control in the project control framework to the complexity of the project.
  4. Describe in detail the controls needed to manage a project schedule, risk and cost across the different stages of the commercial project life cycle, including:
    • Explaining the importance of being precise about the scope of work.
    • Describing the use of control accounts, established from the work breakdown structure to manage cost.
    • Demonstrating the importance and use of accurate estimating in a competitive environment.
    • Describing ways in which pro-active and robust risk management can be used to enhance margin during contract delivery.
    • Giving an explanation of the importance of cash flow management to a commercial project organisation and techniques that can be used to improve cash flow.
    • Discussing effective options for the effective management of sub-contractor plans.
    • Applying techniques for forecasting based on earned value metrics.
    • Applying change control in a commercial environment.
  5. Describe the role of project controls in developing and delivering projects in a competitive environment, including opportunity identification, pursuit management and bidding, project mobilisation, delivery and contract close out.
  6. Explain the difference between reactive and proactive project management and the role you play in the latter.

Prerequisites

The course will assume you have a prior understanding of the basic project management processes. Ideally you should have the APMP project management qualification, PRINCE2 or equivalent foundation level training prior to the course. If you have not completed these prior courses you should listen to the following podcasts:

Scope Management
Estimating
Budgeting and Cost Management 
Resource Management 
Project Scheduling
Risk Management
Earned Value Management

These can also be accessed via iTunes.

Course Timings

This course runs 9:00 to 17:00 on days 1 and 2 and 9:00 to 16:00 on day 3. The course includes the preparation of a bid for HS2 during day 2. This is presented at 9:30 on day 3. To prepare for this tender presentation may require some extra time at the end of the day two, depending on the progress your team makes during the day. Please bear this in mind when making travel plans and if possible build flexibility into the end of day two.

Course Structure

Project Controls Pre-contract

  • Why are effective project controls important to project success?
  • An overview of a project control framework.
  • Using level of control to adapt the project control framework to the complexity of the project.
  • The role of project controls during the bidding process.

Bridge Build Exercise

Your opportunity to bid, win and deliver a successful commercial contract.

Establishing Project Controls Post Contract Award

Mobilisation post contract award is one of the most importance and challenging phases in a commercial project. Early deployment of the project team and a set of robust project baselines (scope, time and cost) are vital during this phase to ensure that any risks and issues with the bid documents are identified early in the project. This module covers:

  • Critical contract review and project start-up
    • Scope definition
    • Detailed time planning
    • Cost planning
    • Risk management mobilisation
    • Establishing scope, time, risk, cost baselines as part of a project management plan
    • Establishing an integrated change control process
  • Work package initiation and establishing control accounts

HS2 Bidding Exercise

Bidding for the HS2 project controls contract.

Execute Contract

Project implementation requires on-going execution, monitoring and control of the project.

  • Managing contractors plans
  • Monitoring progress (time management)
  • Forecasting costs based on the intelligent use of earned value metrics (cost management)
  • Controlling risk contingency (risk management)
  • Controlling changes
  • Maximising profit margin
  • Invoicing and controlling cash flow

Tower Build II Exercise

Tower Build II - bringing it all together

Close Out Contract

At the end of a contract it is vital to de-mobilise the contract team without any outstanding liabilities and ensure information required for future contracts is captures.

  • Technical close
  • Commercial close
  • Learning lessons for the future

Action Planning

Each individual will be asked to prepare an individual action plan of areas for application in the work place and future development opportunities.

advanced workshops

Project Management Using The Logical Framework

This course will enable delegates will be able to apply the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) to aid thinking about best approach to projects.

Overview

The Logical Framework Approach (LFA) was developed in the 1960’s by US Agency for International Development to improve its project planning and evaluation and has since been adopted by most multilateral and bilateral development agencies. It provides a set of steps and tools to aid thinking about best approach to projects. As such the process and associated learning is just as important as the output from each step.

The benefits of the LFA approach are:

  1. It places a strong emphasis on stakeholder engagement.
  2. It requires systematic analysing of a problem including identify the cause and effect relationships.
  3. It provides logical linkage between the way the project is delivered and the outcome it seeks to achieve.
  4. It places the project in the wider development context.
  5. It encourages examination of risks and stimulates accountability for the result.
  6. It requires analysis of how to measure the achievement of the objectives.

The workshop sessions will use active learning methods to engage all the delegates in the learning process.

These include:

  1. Individual exercises and self-evaluation quizzes.
  2. Small group brainstorming sessions “buzz groups”.
  3. Case study syndicate exercises using a course project.
  4. Formal team presentations of the team plans for peer review by the course group and tutors

Learning Objectives

At the end of the course delegates will be able to apply the LFA framework including:

  • Understand the philosophy behaving the LFA framework, its strengths and weaknesses
  • Describing the overall process for analysis and planning of projects
  • The tools in the analysis phase including:
    • Stakeholder analysis
    • Problem analysis
    • Objectives analysis
    • Strategy analysis
  • Tools for the planning phase including:
    • Logical framework matrix
    • Activity scheduling
    • Resources scheduling
  • In addition this course will cover the project delivery controls not in the LFA framework including:
    • Control the delivery of the project using simple but effective progress review.
    • Control changes within the project to increase the chances of project success.
    • Use project management start up to develop an effective project team.

Course Structure

1. Course introduction

An introduction to the course learning objectives and structure. Delegate introductions and discussion of their individual needs, the skills they bring to the group and ideals for improving project delivery within their team.

2. Introduction to Logical Framework Approach

The LFA provides a step by step guide to planning development projects. In this session we will examine the overall structure of the LFA and the benefits of adopting a structured approach to projects.

3. Analysis Stage: Understanding the Current Situation

A successful project needs a good understanding of the current situation if it is to deliver successful. The LFA framework has a number of tools to help, understand the background to the project. These include:

  1. Stakeholder analysis
  2. SWOT analysis
  3. Venn diagrams
  4. Spider diagrams

In this session we will review these tools and apply them to case study project to get a better understanding of the current situation.

Syndicate Exercise: Analysis of the current situation using tools from the LFA.

4. Analysis Stage: Problem and Objectives Analysis

Problem analysis is about understanding the root causes and the effects of a problem and objective analysis is identifying what opportunities exist of overcome these problems. By understanding the underlying root causes then we can identify actions to address these root causes. Again the process is as important as the output. In this session we look at the application of problem analysis to a typical project.

Syndicate Exercise: Problem Analysis for a case study project.

5. Analysis Stage: Analysis of Strategies

Based in a detailed understanding of the current situation and the objectives for the project we can decide on the most appropriate strategy to follow. The selection of the most appropriate approach can be based on clearly define criteria such as effectiveness, feasibility, cost and/or environmental impact.

Syndicate Exercise: Complete an analysis of the most appropriate strategy for a case study project

6. Planning Stage

The first stage of planning is to complete a Logframe matrix. This documents the objectives, purpose, results and activities required for the project, and how these will be measures and verified. Finally the Logframe captures the assumptions. It provides a logical link between the activities in the project and the overall objective. In this session se look at the process of preparing and presenting a Logframe matrix.

Syndicate Exercise: Complete a Logframe matrix for a case study project.

7. Developing the Project Schedule.

Understanding the dependencies between the delivery of different work packages and teams at an early stage is vital to the smooth delivery of projects. The precedence diagram is the method to develop these linkages between activities, work packages and teams. We will explore a range of linking relationship available to develop a fair representation of the work plan. This session includes:

  1. Development and use of the precedence diagram.
  2. Typical dependencies including finish-start, start- start, finish-finish.
  3. The use of leads and lags.
  4. Critical path.

Syndicate Exercise: defining the project schedules for a case study or real delegate project.

8. Risk Management

All projects involve risk and so understanding and planning appropriate mitigation strategies early in the process can significantly reduce the chances of project delay and overspend. In this session we will apply the principles of project risk management.

Syndicate Exercise: defining the project schedules for a case study or real delegate project

9. Project control, reporting and change control

Successful project execution requires regular communications to ensure any issues are identified early and action is taken to keep the project on track. This requires simple but effective reporting and a rigorous control of change. In this session we will look at case studies which have suffered from poor change control and report and evaluate how these have affected the project outcomes.

10. Project team development

“People deliver projects”. In this session we will look at how the project management processes can be used to engage team members and build commitment to the planned changes.

11. Self-reflection and action planning

The final session includes the presentation of the plans prepared in syndicate exercises for peer review by the group, followed by individual action planning to define the next steps to apply what has been learned in the course in the workplace.

Individual Exercise: Planning next steps in the work place

Delegates will be automatically registered on the Parallel community of practice, where they can join others who have been part of the programme, share experiences and develop their knowledge through the forum for as long as they want.

advanced workshops

Contract Development and Management for Project Managers

This course is aimed at Project Managers and Team Members responsible for procuring goods and services as part of project delivery.

Overview

Why are Contracts Important for the Project Manager?

The last decades have seen ever more complex projects: sophisticated technology with multiple components, overall specialisation beyond the economic competence of any individual company, ever increasing competition, a shrinking world, in terms of both suppliers, customers and competition, ever tighter timescales and margins. At the same time user requirements have not only become more complex, but also increasingly hard to define, especially within software or other business based systems. The ability to effectively develop and manage contracts has never been more important for the project manager.

Who Should Attend

Project Managers and Team Members responsible for procuring goods and services as part of project delivery. Managers responsible for development and management of contracts with customers. Contracts and procurement support staff. Commercial Managers.

Course Objectives

  • Understand the role importance of an effective contract
  • Understand the key legal concepts underlying contracts and contractual relationships
  • Understand the steps to be taken pre-award
  • Understand the steps in award of contract
  • Understand the key activities to be carried out in effective delivery of the contract.

Course Content

Unit 1: Overview of Contracting

  • The role and importance of contracts
  • Legal aspects of contracts
  • Contractual relationships
  • Commercial models
  • Key terms and conditions

Unit 2: Contract Pricing Types

  • The different pricing mechanisms
  • Incentivised contracts
  • Mixed approaches
  • Choosing the best approach

Unit 3: Contracting Process – Pre-Award

  • Contracting strategy key considerations
  • Evaluation criteria
  • Contracting methods
  • Procurement – legal constraints

Unit 4: Creating the Statement of Requirements

  • Role and importance of the statement of requirements
  • Relationship between contract and SOR
  • Ensuring Clarity of Requirements
  • A Well-Written SOR

Unit 5: Contracting Process – Award

  • Negotiation and award actions

Unit 6: Post-Award: Contract Call-offs

  • The Work Breakdown Structure’s relationship to requirements and SOR
  • Assessing cost estimates against SOR
  • Supplier performance management
  • Methodology for developing KPIs
  • Performance review meetings
  • Addressing performance issues

Unit 7: Contracting Process: Management and Administration

  • Key elements of effective contract management
  • Key accountabilities in contract management and administration
  • Managing and administering contract activities
  • Management of change

Unit 8: Contracting Process – Contract Closeout

  • Contract closeout “best practices”
  • Claims and disputes
  • Termination of a contract

advanced workshops

Financial Management for Project Managers

This course is aimed at project managers and other project team members.

Overview

Project profitability is not simply measured as a function of benefit less costs: rather it is better defined as return on investment. This means that to allow the project team to be in control of, and improve, profitability, they must be able to understand and control not just benefit and costs, but also the investment (i.e. cash) invested in their project. The objectives of this course are to give them the tools and knowledge to do this.

Objectives

This course is aimed at project managers and other project team members.

This course will enable project managers and team members to:

  • See their projects as financial business units within the organisation
  • To understand the terminology and concepts of financial management and be able to relate them to their own projects
  • To understand and be able to use key financial tools
  • To apply these financial concepts and tools in order to increase project and therefore Company profitability
  • Each concept and tool will be demonstrated and practiced using real-life company examples

Agenda

  1. Introduction: projects and the bigger picture
  2. Financial Concepts
  3. Financial Analysis
  4. Asset Management
  5. Project Governance
  6. Pricing/ Costs and the Contract
  7. Cost Estimating and Forecasting
  8. Lessons Learned and Action Plans

Detail

 Agenda Item Content
 1. Introduction: projects and the bigger picture

• The project as a business unit.

• Why project staff should be concerned with the financial picture rather than (as traditionally) simply costs.

 2. Financial Concepts

• The terminology and principles of finance:

• Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP)

• Recognising revenue and matching costs

• Accruals

• Profit & Loss, Balance Sheet, Cash Flow using Ericsson Project Governance

• Case Study/ Exercise Ericsson Governance

 3. Financial Analysis

• Applying financial ratios to interpret financial reports

• Ratios as used in Ericsson Project Governance

• Case Study/ Exercise

 4. Asset Management

• Cash is King!

• Importance of cash flow

• Billing and Recognising Revenue

• Managing Accounts Receivable

• Managing Work In Progress

• Managing Inventory

• Fixed Assets

• Case Study/ Exercise

 5. Project Governance• How revenue, costs, profit and cashflow (incl. inventory, wip, debtors etc) are reported and what the reports mean.
 6. Pricing/ Costs and the Contract

• The Pricing Process

• Understanding where costs may be hidden in the contract

• Importance of the contract in determining price and payment terms.

• Case Study/ Exercise

 7. Cost Estimating and Forecasting

• Principles of costing

• Cost estimation

• PMBOK 4th Edition: 7.1.2 Estimating Costs: Tools & Techniques 7.2.2 Determining Budget: Tools & Techniques

• Forecasting techniques

• Cashflow forecasting – Using Discounted Cashflows, Economic Value Added.

• Case Study/ Exercise

 8. Lessons Learned and Action Plans• Lessons Learned and Action Plans.

advanced workshops

Earned value “Is it worth the effort”

This is a quick overview of the principles, benefits and pitfalls in applying Earned Value Management and a workshop on the barriers to earned value implementation and how they can be overcome.

Overview

This is a quick overview of the principles, benefits and pitfalls in applying Earned Value Management and a workshop on the barriers to earned value implementation and how they can be overcome. In the end I link it back to the project management maturity level in the organisation and the role earned value can have in developing PM maturity.

advanced workshops

Effective Project Leadership

This programme will engage delegates in an exploration of their own and others’ behaviour in order that they can maximise the effectiveness of their teams and create successful stakeholder relationships.

Overview and Background

It is well recognised that the quality of relationships impacts the success of projects: many argue more than any other factor. This programme will engage delegates in an exploration of their own and others’ behaviour in order that they can maximise the effectiveness of their teams and create successful stakeholder relationships. The PMs who operate as leaders are the most successful precisely because they inspire people to “put their hearts” into their work: who create teams that are magically “more than the sum of their parts”.

To achieve this, leaders are required to understand:

  • what makes themselves tick
  • what makes others ‘tick’, their drivers and how they react in certain circumstances
  • the impact they have on the feelings of others.

The programme will use the SDI® (Strength Deployment Inventory®) as the tool to facilitate conversations on self-awareness and team dynamics. The SDI is a proven, memorable tool for improving team effectiveness and reducing the costs of conflict.

This increased awareness will allow participants to, for example, deal more easily with conflict, engage with stakeholders, adapt project management to suit the project and manage risk more effectively.

Target Audience

Experienced project managers at a project leadership level in your organisation, looking to understand their leadership style and maximise their potential to create an effective project team.

Aims Of The Development Programme

The programme aims to develop self awareness in the individuals using widely respected frameworks and diagnostics to help develop an understanding of each individual’s project leadership traits. The programme integrates pre and post coaching to coach individuals to maximise on their strengths to build truly effective project teams.
Duration

This development programme consists of four elements:

  1. Introductory thirty minute telephone or face to face conversation with the tutor (one to two weeks prior to the workshop) to discuss and establish personal expectations, explain the format of the programme, and to gain commitment to attendance at the full programme including action learning sessions, pre-reading, completion of the SDI and a personal questionnaire asking participants to reflect on what they wish to achieve from the programme
  2. Two day residential workshop covering the modules described below.
  3. After one month the tutor will facilitate a one-to-one coaching session to check on progress towards the agreement of an action plan with stakeholders and offer support and advice on the effectiveness and feasibility of the action plans.
  4. After three months the tutor will facilitate a further one-to-one coaching surgery to check on progress with the action plan, offer further advice and collect anecdotal evidence of the implementation effectiveness.

Development programme objectives

At the end of the programme (both workshop and follow up) delegates will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between managing and leading others and the benefits of the latter
  2. Manage their own behaviour in a way that gives them more choices, greater flexibility and encourages greater engagement by others
  3. Clearly understand how personal motivation impacts everyone and how to utilise to enhance their projects
  4. Build high levels of trust and confidence in self and others to deliver results
  5. Increase the effectiveness of their leadership style – enabling them to relate more effectively with more people more of the time by focusing on some of their key professional relationships
  6. Resolve conflict more effectively
  7. Understand how to get the best out of each member of their team
  8. Communicate in ways that others can “hear”
  9. Deliver powerful, passionate messages
  10. Deal more effectively with stakeholders and clients
  11. Gain clear information on what others expect from you and also you require from them
  12. Create more effective teams by understanding the motivation and dynamics between participants and how this requires varying communications styles

Proposed Timetable

The detailed outline proposed timetable for the event is as follows:

Module 1: Introduction

  • Explore individual training needs, objectives and contributions individuals will make to the workshop
  • The role of the project leader; what differentiates the best from the rest?
  • The nature of the leadership challenge in your organisation?

Module 2: Understanding your own motivational style and its impact on leading others?

Delegates will receive feedback on the results of the SDI diagnostic tool completed before the workshop. This will include individual support diagnosing the output from the questionnaire when things are going well and when faced with conflict or opposition.

Module 3: What differentiates the “best from the rest”

Based on detailed research into best in class project managers, this session will explore the attributes of the best project managers in a number of business environments and the relevance to project management in your organisation

Module 4 Teambuilding

Building a performing team takes significant time and effort. In his session individuals will reflect on the performance of their own teams and the challenges they face in improving their performance.

Module 5: Communication

Effective communications requires leaders to deploy a wide range of strategies. In this session you will critically evaluate your own communication preferences and how these are perceived by others in the project team.

Module 6 Dealing with Conflict and Change

Projects involve both internal and external change which can often create significant conflict. Effective management and resolution of conflict is a key skill for project managers. In this session we explore different strategies for facing up to and defusing conflict situations.

Module 7: Diverse teams

Motivating multi disciplinary, multi cultural and virtual teams is a challenge for even to most experienced project manager. This session includes hits and tips to improve you management of diverse teams.

Follow up: Action Learning

An action learning session will take place one month and three months after the two day workshop. The first will be a short term review whilst the latter will be more in depth considering factors that will generate long term performance improvements.

The aims of these sessions are:

  • To develop ownership within the individual of on-going improvement in project delivery
  • To develop mutual accountability with the group
  • To encourage a culture of knowledge sharing and reflective practice

The format is a delegate led review of progress against plan facilitated by the course tutor. Delegates will be asked to identify where the plan has been achieved and where not, what lessons can be shared with the other delegates along with consideration of what else could be done to complete them and realise the benefits. Common emergent themes will be recorded and discussed and extent to which on-going collaboration is adopted by the group with be agreed. Review can be one-to-one, in small action learning groups or over the telephone.

Evaluation

The evaluation of the programme will be through analysis of the feedback forms completed by the delegates at the end of the workshop, completion of action plans, feedback forms completed by course tutors at the end of each workshop, together with feedback of benefits through line managerial reporting structures. Evidence of benefits will also be captured, collated and communicated during the action learning sessions.

Success Criteria

  1. At the end of the workshop, individuals will have identified at least three practical but effective improvement actions which have real potential to increase the capability of your organisation to deliver successful projects.
  2. Within one month of the workshop, all individuals will have agreed their action plans with key stakeholders and made significant progress implementing the priority actions.
  3. Within three months of the workshop, the delegates will have progressed at least one of their priority action plans to such an extent that they can demonstrate benefits to project and programme delivery in your organisation.

advanced workshops

In House Estimating for Project Managers - 2 Days

This course is designed to provide guidance to Project Managers on the principals of how credible cost and schedule estimates are derived.

Overview

This course is designed to provide guidance to Project Managers on the principals of how credible cost and schedule estimates are derived. It will explain how estimates can be interpreted and will highlight areas for special attention. Real case studies and practical exercises will be included.

Learning objectives

At the end of the course delegates will be able:

  1. Define the information required to produce a robust project estimate.
  2. Explain fully the importance of underpinning estimates with clearly defined assumptions.
  3. Critically evaluate an estimate to determine the effect of exclusions on the likely final cost.
  4. Describe the most appropriate estimating methods to use during the project lifecycle.
  5. Explain strengthens and weakness of a range of estimating techniques.

Course Structure

The course follows the following structure:

Day 1

1. An overview of estimating

  • What is an estimate
  • Why produce an estimate
  • How do you establish a sound estimate
  • What makes a credible estimate

2. How to derive an estimate

  • Estimating methodology
  • Boundary of your estimate
  • Life cycle phases
  • Cost breakdown structure

3. Types of estimating and different tools/techniques with examples of each

  • Parametric
  • Analogy
  • Scaling
  • Detailed

4. Data gathering

  • Data requirements
  • Data sources
  • Data gathering and normalisation
  • Data recording and assumptions

Day 2

5. Detailed estimating

  • Getting started - Estimating checklist
  • Establishing estimating strategy
  • Building an estimating model
  • Verification and validation

6. Risk management

  • Risk assessment
  • Risk Analysis
  • Managing risks
  • Risk maturity

7. Economic analysis

  • Investment appraisal
  • Discounted cash flow
  • Inflation
  • How to deal with Exchange Rates

8. Reporting and understanding estimates

  • What to report
  • How to report
  • Business Cases
  • Best practise examples

advanced workshops

Benefits Management – An essential discipline?

Taking a sideways glance at the nature of Benefits Management principles and how best to deploy them, the presentation evolves into the nature of real benefits, how many we can and how many we cannot really measure as well as challenging the belief that they can be.

Overview

Taking a sideways glance at the nature of Benefits Management principles and how best to deploy them, the presentation evolves into the nature of real benefits, how many we can and how many we cannot really measure as well as challenging the belief that they can be systematically measured. Attendees will have the opportunity to practice some with case studies and enjoy each other’s views in an interactive and engaging way.

advanced workshops

In House Risk Management - 1 Day

This one day intensive event is aimed at those with a basic knowledge of risk management but need to take some of the principles to the next stage and understand how risk management can be better used to optimise organisational performance.

Course Outline

This one day intensive event is aimed at those with a basic knowledge of risk management but need to take some of the principles to the next stage and understand how risk management can be better used to optimise organisational performance. Using a case study the delegates will be encouraged to identify and manage the real risks project fail to manage.

Leaning Objectives

By the end of the event the delegates will be able to:

  • Critically analyse their approach to risk management identifying the strengths and weakness in a classic approach to risk management.
  • Describe the impact of the real risks to project and how these can be managed
    Explain and manage the influence of optimism bias on project funding
  • Describe the ways to practically improve the classic approach to risk management
  • Unerstand the nature of project shaping and the role of the sponsor and project manager in de-risking the project
  • Be able to write accurate and meaningful risk descriptions
  • Describe the benefits and dis-benefits of quantitative assessment

Who should attend

The delegates can be from any level of the organisation as the basics will be covered as will the more advanced topics. An open mind is required as the topic is not treated as a systematic process but delegates will be challenged in their attitudes and will be asked to critique their own organisations approach to risk management.

Topics Covered

Introductions
An opportunity to ‘meet and greet’ the tutor and provide some basic information and set some objectives.

Overview of project risk management
The principles of risk management and how the subject has evolved including exposure to the more works on project success and failure. The influence of optimism bias on project appraisals. 

Shaping the project and the role of the sponsor
The nature of shaping a project outcome in the early stages and the roles that are brought to bear to do so.

Identifying the ‘real’ risks in projects; opening the johari window. 
A critical review of the risk management process identifying areas to improve practice. 

Risk Identification
Some tools and techniques for the identification of ‘real’ risks and how to begin to flush them out

Analysis of the nature of opportunities and how to deal with them
Are opportunities just the inverse of Threats? A general discussion on the Pro’s and Con’s of including opportunities on a risk log.

Qualitative Risk Analysis
Basics of how to conceptualise the main components of risk and recording them. Discussion on the other responses outside the normal PI grid frame of reference.

Quantitative Risk Analysis
A critical review of Monte Carlo modelling for analysing risk, can we trust the numbers? 

Risk Response Planning
Making sure that the plans are updated and that the appropriate responses are identified, looking for synergy between responses to threats and impacts

Programme and Corporate Risk Management
Looking at the relationship between the individual project risks and the cumulative effect on a programme and how to spread that risk.

Human dimensions
How the individual has an impact on the outcome of the whole process and what danger lies therein.

Summary and close

advanced workshops

Project Management - T5 vs Wembley - What can we learn?

Heathrow Terminal and Wembley are two high profile projects which are both for different reasons perceived as less than successful by the public. With London 2012 just around the corner, what can the profession learn from these two very different case studies?

Overview

Heathrow Terminal and Wembley are two high profile projects which are both for different reasons perceived as less than successful by the public. With London 2012 just around the corner, what can the profession learn from these two very different case studies.

advanced workshops

Real Risks in Project Management

In this session we look at why the real risk are missing from many risk registers and we can identify the unknown unknowns.

Overview

In this session we look at why the real risk are missing from many risk registers and we can identify the unknown unknowns. This is because many risk registers focus on the “comfort” risk which are easily identified and manager. However the real risk are much more difficult to grasp and almost impossible to manage but cause more damage.

advanced workshops

The critical role of the project sponsor, Process or Behaviour?

This wide ranging talk will take you through the role of the project sponsor, it will look at all the major bodies of thought including the APM, APMG, and NAO and encourage an interactive debate on the role, the need for it and how it can be best implemented.

Overview

This wide ranging talk will take you through the role of the project sponsor, it will look at all the major bodies of thought including the APM, APMG, and NAO and encourage an interactive debate on the role, the need for it and how it can be best implemented. It will be led by John Bolton, a well published and authoritative speaker on the role of the sponsor with significant experience of interacting with the sponsorship communities in major construction and transportation organisations.

advanced workshops

What can we learn from Lean Project Management

This session draws the parallels between Henry Gantt and Fredrick Taylor and how manufacturing has developed significantly beyond the principles of Scientific Management.

Overview

This session draws the parallels between Henry Gantt and Fredrick Taylor and how manufacturing has developed significantly beyond the principles of Scientific Management. I argue that project management is still to wedded to the principles of scientific management and we need to learn from the changes in manufacturing such as the Toyota Production System. Compare the quality of cars produced today with those produced in the 1970’s. Using approaches such as waste reduction, critical chain, last planner, pull scheduling and harnessing the power of the team could be transformational.